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0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

  BACK TO 1942 – INSIDER BRIEFING
Filmmaker Feng Xiaogang met the author Liu Zhenyun in 1993, when his original memoir of the famine was first published and decided that he needed to experience the journey of the refugees depicted in the story at first hand. For three months he travelled with his scriptwriting team from Henan to Shaanxi, and to Chongqing, interviewing many people along the route who had survived the famine: the result is the epic Back to 1942.
  BAD TEACHER – CAMERON DIAZ
Playing an outrageous, foul-mouthed bad girl in Bad Teacher is just the best, says Cameron Diaz in these extracts from the background notes on the making of the film.
BAFTA 2002: NOMINATIONS BAFTA 2002: NOMINATIONS
In true British fashion, the BAFTA Awards are generous to international filmmakers, but they adore their own: and in the international list, Australia and New Zealand are well represented, reports Andrew L. Urban.
BAFTA 2002: WINNERS BAFTA 2002: WINNERS
It has taken the British Academy to recognise excellence in non-US filmmaking like Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings and Shrek, not to mention Russell Crowe and Moulin Rouge.
BAFTA 2003 - THE NOMINATIONS BAFTA 2003 - THE NOMINATIONS
Who’s afraid of Virginia Woolf now? Well, the Americans, who face coming second to the British film in the BAFTA Award tally, reports Andrew L. Urban, as The Hours gains two top nominations.
BAFTA 2003 - THE WINNERS BAFTA 2003 - THE WINNERS
Nicole Kidman’s nosey portrayal of the tormented British novelist Virginia Woolf in The Hours has won her the BAFTA Award for Best Actress, shortening the odds for a hat trick at the Oscars for the Aussie actress, but, contrary to expectations, it was Roman Polanski’s The Pianist which won the Best Film and Best Director awards.
  BAFTA 2004 – WINNERS
Other than for the Australian winners, the BAFTA Awards should also interest Australians for what they show us about movie sensibilities in the English speaking world outside Hollywood. Andrew L. Urban reports.
  BAFTA 2004: NOMINATIONS
Cold Mountain has been nominated in 13 categories and The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King in 12 for the forthcoming Orange British Academy Film Awards; and star power is underlined with Scarlett Johansson’s (pic) nomination for Actress in a Leading Role for both of her performances in two vastly different films, Girl With A Pearl Earring and Lost In Translation. Sean Penn is also nominated twice for Actor In A Leading Role, for 21 Grams and Mystic River.
  BAFTA 2009 - NOMINATIONS
The BAFTA nominations are a curious case, besides Benjamin Button: Winslet twice, Mike Leigh nonce, and Heath Ledger again a favourite – says Andrew L. Urban
  BAFTA 2009 - WINNERS
Had Slumdog Millionaire been mostly in Hindu not English, it would probably have won the foreign language BAFTA as well as everything else won by the film: Best Film, Director, Adapted Screenplay, Music, Cinematography, Editing and Sound. There were only two awards set aside for emotionally charged winners: Best Supporting Actor and Best Actor, which went to Heath ledger and Micky Rourke respectively. Andrew L. Urban reports direct from his seat in front of the tv.
  BAFTA 2010 – WINNERS
Kathryn Bigelow is getting bigger; she’s just won two of the biggest film awards in the world as producer and director of The Hurt Locker, while her ex, the producer and director of Avatar, the world’s most popular film ever made, James Cameron, saw two technical (but well deserved awards) go to his team. Bigelow’s wins at the BAFTA presentation could only be topped by the Oscars presented in two weeks in Los Angeles. Andrew L. Urban reports.
  BAFTA 2011 – WINNERS
The King’s Speech was crowned not only Best British Film but Best Film overall at this year’s BAFTA ceremonies, sweeping with it awards for both Colin Firth and Geoffrey Rush, as well as a supporting coronet for Helena Bonham Carter, who plays the King’s wife. It also won for screenplay and music.
  BAFTA 2013 - NOMINATIONS
The nominees for Outstanding British Film in this year’s BAFTA nominations is almost interchangeable with the Best Film nominations, showing the exceptionally strong year for excellence in English language filmmaking – with a few nods to the French. Andrew L. Urban looks over the list
  BAFTA 2013 – WINNERS
Here’s a turn-up for the books, as the Brits might say, with Argo winning the Best Film BAFTA, when it was the Brits who complained about the film depicting their Embassy in an unflattering and apparently untrue light when it is shown to turn away the US Embassy staff seeking refuge from the Tehran mob...
  BAFTA AWARD 2007 - WINNERS
George Miller’s Happy Feet (Animation) joins The Last King of Scotland (best Brit film) and The Queen as the big winners at this year’s BAFTAs, and the surprise screenplay award to Little Miss Sunshine.
  BAFTA AWARDS 2006 - WINNERS
Destined to being forever referred to in lazy and inaccurate reporting as a gay cowboy movie (they tend sheep, for a start), Brokeback Mountain has gathered four more major awards at this year’s BAFTAs - Best Film, Best Director, Best Supporting Actor, Best Adapted Screenplay – while Wallace & Gromit was voted Best British Film, and Australia’s Dion Beebe deservedly took home the award for his cinematography in Memoirs of a Geisha.
  BAFTA AWARDS 2007 - NOMINATIONS
George Miller’s Happy Feet is nominated for Best Animation and for Best Music (John Powell), Mel Gibson and Bruce Davey’s Apocalypto is up for non-English language film honours, while two Australian actresses star in films nominated for Best Film: Cate Blanchett in Babel and Toni Collette in Little Miss Sunshine. But it’s The Queen (with 10 nominations including Helen Mirren as Best Actress) which is expected to reign at the BAFTAs, to be presented February 11 at London’s Royal Opera House.
  BAFTA AWARDS 2008 - NOMINATIONS
Brit film, Atonement, has the highest profile at the 2008 BAFTAs with 14 nominations, including one each for Best Film AND Best British Film. While Cate Blanchett is nominated for Best Actress (Elizabeth: The Golden Age) AND Best Supporting Actress (I’m Not There).
  BAFTA AWARDS 2008 - WINNERS
As expected, Atonement has won the Best BAFTA, and The Lives of Others the Best Foreign BAFTA, with the low budget This Is England winning the Best British award. But the Coen brothers weren’t ignored: they got Best Director for No Country for Old Men.
  BAFTA AWARDS 2010 - NOMINATIONS
The Brits are smart: the BAFTAs have a category all to themselves, so if a Yank like James Cameron interlopes with the blockbuster to Win All Awards like Avatar, they still have something up their sleeve – like An Education, which has an each way bet in both categories. Andrew L. Urban reports.
  BAFTA AWARDS 2012 - WINNERS
The whole world, it seems, has been seduced by Michel Hazanavicius’ silent B&W romantic ode to 1920s Hollywood, The Artist, with the Brits paying generous attention with seven BAFTA Awards, including Best Film and Best Director. The British Academy also generously awarded their Fellowship to American filmmaker Martin Scorsese, perhaps some consolation for his film, Hugo, not being awarded anything but Production Design.
  BAFTA AWARDS 2014 – WINNERS
The Brits know how to have your cake and eat it, too, judging by the BAFTA Categories for top honours, with 12 Years A Slave taking the Best Film award and Gravity winning for Outstanding British Film, at the 2014 BAFTA Awards on Sunday night (Feb. 16, London time), at a ceremony hosted by the eternally engaging Stephen Fry.
  BAFTA AWARDS 2015 – NOMINATIONS
There are five nominees for Best Film and six for Outstanding British Film, an anomaly that underlines the British penchant for eccentricity, perhaps, reports Andrew L. Urban.
  BAFTA AWARDS 2017 - WINNERS
The contrast couldn’t be greater between the two major award winners at the 2017 BAFTAs: the joyous musical ode to Hollywood that is La La Land (Best Film) and the miserable damnation of the British social service system [blamed on the Tories] that is I, Daniel Blake (Best British Film).
  BAFTA NOMINATIONS - 2012
Winners will be announced on Sunday 12 February at London's Royal Opera House.
  BAFTA NOMINATIONS 2005
With one of the likely major contenders for top BAFTA honours, Clint Eastwood’s Million Dollar Baby) opening too late in the UK (Jan 14) for the 2004 season awards, Martin Scorsese has probably his best chance at a major BAFTA award with The Aviator, and Cate Blanchett has a second chance, reports Andrew L. Urban. (Pic. The Aviator)
  BAFTAS 2016: MAD MAX WINS ‘LOOKS’ AWARDS, REVENANT BEST FILM
Mad Max: Fury Road has won BAFTAs for production design, costumes, make up, and editing, but it is The Revenant that won Best Film, Best Director (Alejandro G Inarritu), Best Actor (Leonardo DiCaprio), Best Cinematography (Emmanuel Lubezki) & Best Sound – while despite nine nominations, Carol did not win any of them.
BAISE-MOI BANNED - READERS RESPOND BAISE-MOI BANNED - READERS RESPOND
20/6/2002: In last week’s edition, Andrew L. Urban called into question the banning of films, in this case Baise-Moi, when public opinion does not support such a ban, and making the classification system subservient to blatant censorship. Readers responded robustly: “Baise Moi? No, f . . . you!”
  BALIBO – INSIDER BRIEFING
The filmmakers of Balibo exhume the killing of unarmed young Australian journalists in the 1975 invasion of East Timor by Indonesian forces, a reminder that evil will flourish when good men and women do nothing. Andrew L. Urban reports
BAN OF FILM = LOSS OF TOLERANCE BAN OF FILM = LOSS OF TOLERANCE
Police stopped screenings of Base-Moi in Sydney last month, when the film was effectively banned (after its initial R classification), on the complaints of two members of the public - and the review board’s report is still not published*. If we let this action pass without loud and sustained objection, we deserve the Governments we will continue to get, warns Andrew L. Urban, and the loss of social tolerance that results.
BAN THE BAN! OUR READERS RAGE AGAINST THE CENSORS BAN THE BAN! OUR READERS RAGE AGAINST THE CENSORS
Here we go again! After the Lolita debacle, the censors are still trying to protect us from images of human sexuality. Our readers respond in no uncertain manner! Like: "Oh for heaven's sake, of course it shouldn't be banned."
BANDITS BANDITS
In Bandits, Cate Blanchett finds her ideal partner. The only problem is, he is made up of the best parts of two men, the confident Joe (Bruce Willis) and the chronically indecisive Terry (Billy Bob Thornton). And they are bank robbers by trade. Jean Ford reports on Barry Levinson’s new film.
  BANK JOB, THE – THE REAL ROBBERY
Exactly 30 years before the terrible terrorist attacks on New York on September 11, 2001, a very different kind of crime was taking place on the other side of the Atlantic. Bank robbers in London were emptying the contents of deposit boxes belonging to the rich and famous, not realising that amongst the contents were raunchy photos that would cause a huge Royal scandal. After years of research and development, that story is now told in The Bank Job – and reveals an Australian link.
  BATHING FRANKY - ON THE ROAD
Michael Winchester, writer and producer of Bathing Franky (dir. Owen Elliott, stars Henri Szeps & Maria Venuti), recounts the progress of the low budget film; like a snail with its house on its back, Winchester, Owen and team Titan View, are taking the film around Australia in a painstaking and determined program to screen it for its target audience of seniors.
  BATMAN BEGINS – IT'S FOR REAL
If you walked outside today, maybe there would be a Batman in Chicago that could do the things that Batman does - and that reality is a very strong departure from the other Batman films, the makers of Batman Begins tell Jenny Cooney Carrillo while she visits the set and shares a steak with the new Batman, Christian Bale.
  BAYSIDE FILM FESTIVAL 2013 – PREVIEW
Under the guidance of new Artistic Director, Richard Moore, who ran the Melbourne International Film Festival from 2007 to 2010, the 2013 season of Bayside boasts a greatly expanded programme incorporating Q&A with filmmaker David Brooks, live performance, and premiere screenings designed to give audiences both a local and international film experience.
  BE COOL – THE REALITY MOVIE
It may be fiction, but Be Cool could well begin with a black screen on which is written: This is based on the cool version of truth. The story is invented, but the characters are as real as a writer can make them, thanks to novelist Elmore Leonard. Cast and crew, led by John Travolta, talk about the making of the film.
BEACH, THE BEACH, THE
What makes The Beach a fascinating story - and a vivid, memorable film - is its valid observation about human nature. LEONARDO DICAPRIO and director DANNY BOYLE talk about the issues that inspired them to make the film.
  BEATLES, THE: EIGHT DAYS A WEEK – THE TOURING YEARS
A compilation of found footage featuring music, interviews and stories of The Beatles 250 concerts from 1963 to 1966 (opens in Australia on September 16, 2016) is like a rush of musical nostalgia – taking us back to those memorable, socially and musically blooming years in the 60s.
  BEATTY, WARREN - LIFE ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 2008
At a gala ceremony in Los Angeles this week, Warren Beatty was awarded the American Film Institute's (AFI) 36th AFI Life Achievement Award, the highest honour granted by the Institute for a career in film.
  BEAUTIFUL KATE – INSIDER BRIEFING
Beautiful Kate is Rachel Ward’s debut feature, a story of family dysfunction, guilt, salvation – and sexual provocation, all elements that drew her to tell the story, transplanted from its American setting to the Australian outback, complemented with rough hews Australian charm – and a damn fine cast. Just prior to its Australian release (August 6, 2009) the film was invited to screen at the 2009 Toronto Film Festival (September, 2009). What makes it special? Andrew L. Urban talks to Rachel Ward, Bryan Brown and producer Leah Churchill-Brown.
  BECK – CRIME IN A COLD CLIMATE
The release of a double-DVD pack of four films featuring popular Stockholm detective Martin Beck, highlights the continuing popularity of films with a noir sensibility - among the rich and textured menu of world movies in the Aztec library. Andrew L. Urban reports.
  BEFORE THE DEVIL KNOWS YOU'RE DEAD – GIVE ME MELODRAMA
Sidney Lumet understands and loves melodrama, which is why he was the only director in a seven year search to grab Kelly Materson’s screenplay of Before the Devil Knows You’re Dead, in which he also reconfirms his prowess with actors.
BEGINS THE REVOLUTION BEGINS THE REVOLUTION
Andrew L. Urban reports on how a crop of new Australian filmmakers - who happen to be black (like Rachael Maza, pictured) - are on the brink of a revolution that will reach our screens soon. He attends one of their meetings.
  BEHIND THE MAD-NESS - IT'S A MAD, MAD, MAD, MAD WORLD
On the eve of its 40th anniversary Australian tour in a new and fabulously restored version, Patrick Conlan*, a mad fan of It’s A Mad Mad Mad Mad World, tracks the amazing history of one of the most celebrated comedies ever made, directed by the great Stanley Kramer who was best known for seriously dramatic films.
BEIJING BICYCLE: WINNERS BEIJING BICYCLE: WINNERS
We asked: "Who in your family should get a bike and why?" Family members were the most popular, including mothers-in-law and grannies. Below are the lucky winners. Prizes courtesy Columbia TriStar.
  BEN-HUR – FROM SCREEN TO STADIUM
Never mind 3D movies – the latest $15 million Ben-Hur ‘remake’ will be Live in the Amphitheatre! (October 22, 23, ANZ Stadium, Sydney) narrated by Russell Crowe, with a cast of 200, large scale music, big screens and a full 24 horse chariot race. And in the audience will be a Sydney man called … Ben Hur.
  BEN-HUR – THE STORY
The story of Ben-Hur as adapted for the stadium show in Australia (October 22 & 23, 2010) by writer/director Robert Hossein, follows the 1880 novel by Lew Wallace.
  BENEATH HILL 60 - THE MAKING OF
Andrew L. Urban went high above ground (to the 25th floor of Sydney’s Intercontinental Hotel) to meet director Jeremy Sims and his star Brendan Cowell, to dig up a few battle yarns about the making of Beneath Hill 60 – the untold story of Australian mining engineer Oliver Woodward drafted to blow up a hill full of Nazi troops in World War I from a maze of tunnels deep beneath enemy lines.
BERLIN FILM FESTIVAL - 2000 BERLIN FILM FESTIVAL - 2000
MARY COLBERT braves Berlin's wintry conditions to report on the 50TH Berlinale - it's moved from No Man's Land to a shopping complex, but "in Berlin's defence, its selection of European films is to a large extent hampered by the fact that many countries - Australia for one, France another - target production schedules towards Cannes."
  BERLIN FILM FESTIVAL 2004 – IT'S A WRAP
Australians make a splash at this year’s Berlin Film Festival, Helen Barlow reports, while Charlize Theron thumps her director and Jack Nicholson consoles his friend Diane Keaton. But the awards are still subject to Festival-ism.
  BERLIN FILM FESTIVAL 2006 - WRAP
It snowed on cue in Berlin as the 2006 Berlinale opened with Snow Flake, starring Sigourney Weaver, but things soon hotted up with a mix of politics and debates about the jury’s surprising choices for the major prizes. And the negative Berlin reaction to Australia’s entry, Candy, starring Heath Ledger and Abbie Cornish came as another surprise to Helen Barlow.
  BERLIN FILM FESTIVAL 2006 – PREVIEW
Heath Ledger maintains a high profile as he promotes the world premiere of his new Australian film, Candy, at the 2006 Berlinale, joined by several other Australians supporting the strongest representation of Australian films in years at the most political film festival in Europe, reports Helen Barlow.
  BERLIN FILM FESTIVAL 2007 - WRAP
This year’s Berlin Film Festival was not lacking in glitz and glamour. Jennifer Lopez, Cate Blanchett and Sharon Stone graced the red carpet in their finery. Clint Eastwood and Robert De Niro upped the quality quotient when they presented their latest efforts as directors. There were ageing blondes, Marianne Faithful and Lauren Bacall delivering fine performances and giving fun interviews. There were some good films and there was ample mediocrity. It’s kind of what festivals are about, reports Helen Barlow.
  BERLIN FILM FESTIVAL 2008 – PREVIEW
On the eve of the 58th Berlinale, Nick Roddick sums up the mood as the red carpet crowd anticipate the arrival of not just Martin Scorsese but the subjects of his new film, gladiator rock band The Rolling Stones, gathering the moss of adulation.
  BERLIN FILM FESTIVAL 2010 – WRAP
Berlin’s selection of mostly small, slow, narrow-appeal films makes it look like the incredible shrinking film festival which urgently needs to redefine its priorities, says Nick Roddick.
  BERLIN FILM FESTIVAL 2014 - PREVIEW
Bulging with films from Asia and Latin America, this year’s festival in the middle of Europe also has one special attraction for Nick Roddick: 92-year-old Alain Resnais’ last (?) film, Aimer, boire et chanter.
  BERLIN FILM FESTIVAL 2014 - WRAP
The weather was a pleasant surprise, not so the official selection, says Nick Roddick, but there were a couple of gems – although not suitably recognised by the jury.
BERLIN FILM FESTIVAL: 2002 BERLIN FILM FESTIVAL: 2002
After Cannes, the Berlin Festival vies with Venice for second place in the crowded European Festival arena, and with almost 400 films, it is certainly the biggest. The difference is that the films screening in the bustling German capital are freely available to the public, and there's a groovier energy to the proceedings as well, reports Helen Barlow. Not to mention tons of Aussies.
  BERRI, CLAUDE - OBITUARY
Those who noticed Claude Berri’s debut feature film, the modest black white production Le Vieil Homme et L’Enfant/The Two of Us way back in 1967 could hardly have anticipated that its director would, in a career that lasted over forty years, become one of the titans of French film production and a film-maker who would draw tributes from the President of the Republic down when his sudden death from a stroke was reported on Monday 12 January, writes Geoff Gardner.
  BEST (OUR FAVOURITE) FILMS OF 2011
Many people – especially young couples with children – find it hard to get to the cinema to catch new releases and see them on DVD a little later. To help them choose – and to highlight our selection – we have listed our favourite films of 2011, with links to the reviews.
  BEST AND WORST FILMS OF 2014
Everybody loves lists – it’s a genetic thing humans have. So here are our lists for the best and worst films we have seen during 2014. In our opinion, of course.
  BEST NEW FILMS OF 2008 (JAN - APR)
At the end of the first third of 2008, editor Andrew L. Urban flicks through the new releases and picks his favourites. Of the 91 films released and reviewed on our pages, I’ve selected those that are satisfying cinema and of genuine lasting value – and found 15. No doubt others will have a different list; we all experience movies through the prism of our own unique experiences and tastes.
BETTER THAN SEX BETTER THAN SEX
Better Than Sex is a compulsive movie title, and the film is living up to its promise, which, as ANDREW L. URBAN discovered, was quickly recognised by backers.
  BEYOND THE GAME
The tough female protagonist is played by Ellen Page; Willem Dafoe plays an enigmatic scientist in the upcoming Beyond: Two Souls, a PlayStation video game with the DNA of a movie. It is the first game to be invited to a film festival: Tribeca, New York, 2013. Andrew L. Urban reports on a Sydney forum where the future was present.
BIFF CLOSES - UP 25% BIFF CLOSES - UP 25%
BIFF has closed its 6th annual event with a stunning 25 % rise in attendances, with films like Suzaku from Japan (pictured), which was one of the best films screened, according to our man at BIFF, DAVID EDWARDS.
BIFF: IT'S BOFFO! BIFF: IT'S BOFFO!
Brisbane audiences are keen to see quality films, judging by the response to the Brisbane International Film Festival, reports DAVID EDWARDS, in our continuing coverage of the youngest capital city festival in Australia.
  BIG PICTURE FILM FESTIVAL 2014 – PREVIEW
Fittingly enough, one of the films in the Big Picture festival program is The Missing Picture, Rithy Panh’s unique film in which little clay figurines represent Cambodians slaughtered by the Khmer Rouge in the 70s, including his own family, of whom no pictures or images remain. (The Missing Picture opens commercially on March 20.) Andrew L. Urban reports
  BILLY LYNN’S LONG HALFTIME WALK - EVERYBODY WANTS A PIECE
19-year-old Billy Lynn is brought home for a victory tour after a harrowing Iraq battle. Through flashbacks the film shows what really happened to his squad - contrasting the realities of war with America's perceptions. What is Ang Lee’s latest film really about? Andrew L. Urban reports.
BIOPIC WEEK BIOPIC WEEK
With four biopics out of this week’s six movie releases and a further two DVD releases we review dealing with real people, it’s a feast for those who, like our editor Andrew L. Urban, love biopics.
BIRTHDAY HONOURS LIST BIRTHDAY HONOURS LIST
As part of our fourth birthday celebrations in February 2001, we are establishing the Urban Cinefile Birthday Honours List, recognising Outstanding Achievement by Australians in the world of film. This is the first Australian vehicle to pay tribute to Australians working internationally, as well as in Australian films.
BITCH: HUMBERT HUMBERT BITCH: HUMBERT HUMBERT
Lolita is ringing bells with the dingalings - but is this a case of selective morality?
  BLACK BOOK - SHADES OF GREY
Twenty years after leaving Netherlands for the United States, Verhoeven returned to his country to make Black Book, a story inspired by real events during the war, a film which tells how reality and morality were displayed in shades of grey, not black and white. Verhoeven talks about why and how he persevered for so long to make the film.
BLACK ORCHID LIMOUSINES BLACK ORCHID LIMOUSINES

NEXT TIME YOU GO TO THE MOVIES - YOU BE THE STAR

BLACK ROCK: BETWEEN A ROCK AND A HARD PLACE BLACK ROCK: BETWEEN A ROCK AND A HARD PLACE

The culture of mateship among teenage boys is not always a positive force, as the new Australian drama, Blackrock, suggests. Andrew L. Urban spoke to the filmmakers of this powerful and controversial film.

BLAIR WITCH 2 - WHY MAKE A SEQUEL? BLAIR WITCH 2 - WHY MAKE A SEQUEL?
In light of the negative views of our critics, and to offer our readers further insight, here we give director and co-writer Joe Berlinger a chance to discuss his reasons for – and approach to - Book of Shadows in his own words
BLAIR WITCH: Bewitching History BLAIR WITCH: Bewitching History
The anticipation preceding the low budget fright-film, The Blair Witch Project, owes a great deal to the elaborate backstory created by the filmmakers and shoved onto the internet, helping to build a faux-scenario onto which the audience could project their own dark fears, says ANDREW L. URBAN.
  BLANCANIEVES - FEATURED PREVIEW
A re-telling of the classic Brothers’ Grimm fairy tale Snow White, Blancanieves is a breathtakingly beautiful film and a uniquely spirited homage to the black-and-white Golden Age of Europe’s silent cinema. (Opens October 24, 2013)
  BLANCHETT, CATE – 2015 LONGFORD LYELL AWARD
Cate Blanchett is this year (2015) awarded Australia’s highest screen honour: the AACTA Longford Lyell Award (Wednesday,Dec. 9 at AACTA Awards). Andrew L. Urban glances through her career, recalling some of the conversations they had about her films and her views on acting.
BLAXPLOITATION COLLECTION BLAXPLOITATION COLLECTION
A whole new generation has grown up since Shaft burst onto cinema screens in 1971, launching what has since become a wide-ranging genre called Blaxploitation. Isaac Hayes' Oscar winning theme from the film is its anthem, and Richard Roundtree's "flamboyant and tough talking" (The New York Times) Detective Shaft its prime role model. But there is more; ANDREW L. URBAN reports.
BLOOD OATH - THE DVD BLOOD OATH – THE DVD
Exactly 11 years ago last week, Blood Oath had its Japanese premiere in Tokyo; it brought together the men who were on opposite sides in the war crimes trial of 1946 on which it is based. Now the DVD brings the film – and all the historical context – to a new audience, at a most relevant time in world affairs. Andrew L. Urban reports on the Australian film with global ramifications that uncovered a terrible secret.
  BLU-RAY – THE PROS AND CONS
Are you thinking of going Hooray for Blu-ray this Christmas? Be sure you know what you’re getting into, says Ben Hooft, as he explains the pros and cons of Blu-ray so you can make an informed choice.
BLURRED BLURRED
Blurred … is the title of the movie, which also describes the way its characters see life during that crazy dead zone of time called schoolies week, when teenagers finally leave high school. Andrew L. Urban meets the filmmakers and some of the cast
  BOB HOPE & CO - ON THE ROAD AGAIN
  BODYGUARD, THE – THE MUSICAL
You could say, as they sometimes do in Hollywood, The Bodyguard is a ‘high concept’ story: former Secret Service agent turned bodyguard Frank Farmer is hired to protect superstar singer Rachel Marron from an unknown stalker. Each expects to be in charge – what they don’t expect is to fall in love. The 1992 movie (d: Mick Jackson) starred Kevin Costner as Frank Farmer and Whitney Houston as pop star Rachel Marron.
  BONDI TSUNAMI - THE NEW WAVE
The iconoclastic new Australian low budget feature film, Bondi Tsunami, begins a national tour of cinemas under the care of the producers themselves this week, in a textbook example of what Australian filmmakers are being encouraged to do - find alternative ways of making and distributing their films in the face of an increasingly tough mainstream system. Andrew L. Urban reports.
  BONDI TSUNAMI – MAKING NEW WAVES
As Bondi Tsunami is released in Australia on DVD*, the film is generating enormous interest around the world. Here is a dramatic example of the flip side of Australian filmmaking: independent, privately financed, digitally made and successfully hand-distributed. But it’s the quality of the imagination behind it that has made it all possible. The filmmakers tell their story in their own words.
BOOTMEN: ON LOCATION BOOTMEN: ON LOCATION
Fifty million dollars later . . . ANDREW L. URBAN is invited onto the set of BOOTMEN, the film that Dein Perry of the hugely successful stage show, Tap Dogs (with $50 million global box office takings) and Steel City fame is making, an all Australian dance drama about one girl, two working class Newcastle brothers, and brilliant, industrial strength tap dancing.
  BORAT - TRAVEL TO BORAT COUNTRY
Win one of 24 exclusive places (tour limited to 2 couples) organised by Urban Cinefile Anywhere (Very) Limited; 12 day tour departs November 32, 2020. Minimum age: 14. Maximum age 12. Insurance not included. Medical expenses not included. Food not included. Travel not included. Accomodation extra. BYO.
BOSWELL, KENT: Naked in New York BOSWELL, KENT: Naked in New York
Young Australian filmmaker Kent Boswell, one of the winners of arena's Graveyard Shift Award for Best Short B Film, with the grizzly comedy, Bondi Hophead Zombie Freakout, posed naked on the Brooklyn Bridge after completing his tenure at the New York Film Academy; we've been following his progress, and this is his last letter from New York.
BOWLING FOR COLUMBINE BOWLING FOR COLUMBINE
Fear makes Americans the gun-lovers they are, says filmmaker Michael Moore, in his latest and most compelling film, Bowling For Columbine, which rips to shreds the idea that gun ownership in America is just for self protection. Andrew L. Urban reports.
BOX OFFICE 2001 BOX OFFICE 2001
With a healthy rise of 17.8% to $812,385,000, Australian box office takings passed the A$800million mark in 2001, with admissions over 90 million for the first time (92,527,000), close to five movies p.a. per head of population (19 million). Some of us must be seeing an awful lot more.
  BOY - PAINFUL AND FUNNY
Like all films that touch us, Boy is filled with acute and often painful reality – but reality is a multifaceted force that can be painful and funny all at once, as New Zealand writer director Taika Waititi explains in his notes to Boy, his first feature film
BOYS, THE: Feature BOYS, THE: Feature
  BRAM STOKER ALIAS BRAM HELSING?
Dracula’s creator Abraham (‘Bram’) Stoker (pic) may have seen himself as the monster-slaying Abraham Van Helsing, hence lending the character his first name. It wouldn’t be the first time that an author projects himself into the action of the pages of his novel.
  BRAVE ENOUGH FOR DESTINY
Destiny, fate ... and the courage to find one’s own special path in life are eternal themes for storytellers, and Pixar’s team have given their new film the aptest of titles: Brave.
  BREATH OF FRESH AIR FILM FESTIVAL 2014 – PREVIEW
With 13 narrative features, 16 documentaries, 30 shorts and its central agenda-driven 11 ‘Action Sessions’, this year’s BOFA Film Festival is dedicated to change: “We see screen based stories as a powerful way to inspire people to take action – and to create change in the world,” is how festival director Owen Tilbury has put it. Andrew L. Urban reports.
  BRINGING CAPTAIN NEMO BACK
Earlier this year, The Hollywood Reporter said that Columbia Pictures had bought Alfred Gough and Miles Millar's script Captain Nemo, based on the fictional character of the same name. To the excitement of fans everywhere, the premise of the film was supposed to offer "a new take on the iconic antihero" first introduced to readers in Jules Verne's 1870s classic, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea."
BRISBANE FILM FEST CLOSES - ALIVE AND KICKING BRISBANE FILM FEST CLOSES - ALIVE AND KICKING
Our man on the spot, DAVID EDWARDS, does a diagnostic scan of this year’s just-concluded event – and pronounces it healthy.
BRISBANE FILM FESTIVAL - CAPSULE REVIEWS BRISBANE FILM FESTIVAL – CAPSULE REVIEWS
There are a million cinema lovers in a big city, but only one has to file a report for Urban Cinefile at dawn… David Edwards (with apologies to Raymond Carver).(Pic, Dead Letter Office)
  BRISBANE FILM FESTIVAL 2006 - WRAP
Brisbane’s film festival – its 15th – is characterised by quirks, twists, surprises and a desire to present a well planned program, including some bold Australian films, and a special (excellent) effort, with its Cinesparks sidebar, to turn curious younger audiences into future ticket buyers, reports Geoff Gardner.
BRISBANE INT. FILM FESTIVAL 1999: Preview BRISBANE INT. FILM FESTIVAL 1999: Preview
Anne Demy-Geroe hopes this year’s Brisbane International Film Festival will bring "adventurous, innovative, challenging" cinema, with the biggest program in its history, reports DAVID EDWARDS.
BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 1997 BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 1997
The Sixth Brisbane International Film Festival starts on July 31 and promises some 70 features and 100 shorts over 11 days on the theme "Imagination ... Inspiration". The degree of inspiration involved remains to be seen, but a good deal of imagination is already evident in the Festival programming, reports DAVID EDWARDS from Brisbane.
BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2000: PREVIEW BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2000: PREVIEW
The Beat Generation, Shirley Barrett's new film, Bryan Brown and an overall boffo program in Brisbane, reports DAVID EDWARDS.
BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2001 - A PREVIEW BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2001 – A PREVIEW
It’s bigger and broader - and for its 10th Birthday a bit richer - reports David Edwards on the 2001 festival in the Sunshine State
BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2003 - PREVIEW BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2003 – PREVIEW
A re-politicised Anne Demy Geroe takes the Brisbane International Film Festival into all the war zones – both physical and emotional - through films that reflect today’s troubled world, reports Andrew L. Urban. But it’s not all gloom; there’s always the Gold Coast heist movie . . . and Undead.
  BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2004 – PREVIEW
In a first for Brisbane, the Festival has a 12-film sidebar showcasing Bohemian gothic – movies that explore the dark and the frightening, in a section dedicated to Czech Horror, with a features program that has been touring the US. But there’s much more, as Festival director Anne Demy-Geroe outlines to Andrew L. Urban. (Pic. The Pied Piper)
  BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2005 - WRAP
With its unique selections from Asia, especially East Asia, and its retrospectives, Brisbane offers a film festival that’s daring and different, reports Geoff Gardner (a Southerner!), while keeping track of the best of new Australian films.
  BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2006 – PREVIEW
As tickets go on sale for this year’s Brisbane International Film Festival, Andrew L. Urban previews the program, which is the biggest yet, with some 300 films on offer, and featuring a sidebar on women in Islamic cinema that is festival director’s Anne Demy-Geroe’s favourite section.
  BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2008 – WRAP
A spontaneous post-screening haka, Picasso and seared emu were just some of the interstitials at this year’s Brisbane film fest (July 31 – Aug. 10), which recorded a 10% rise in ticket sales and a satisfying and challenging program, starting with Morgan Spurlock’s Osama Bin Laden. Andrew L. Urban reports.
  BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2009 – PREVIEW
As Queensland celebrates its 150th birthday this year, the Brisbane International Film Festival (July 30 – August 9) will highlight Queensland films, starting with the very first film to screen in the program, the short film Auntie Maggie and the Womba Wakgun, from Leah Purcell, screening before the opening night feature, An Education. Andrew L. Urban reports.
  BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2009 – WRAP
The 18 year old Brisbane International Film Festival came of age years ago, but it’s still appropriate that this year’s Opening Film, An Education, is a poignant story about a 16 year old English girl in the 60s, made by one of Denmark’s finest directors, Lone Scherfig, her first English language feature – and symbolic of the blossoming and broadening of all concerned, writes Andrew L. Urban.
  BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL 2010 – PREVIEW
Alfred Hitchock, Louise Alston and cane toads (opening night film) sit side by side and the extensive list of festival sections – from animation, local heroes, music and shock corridor to world cinema – all point to the extensive Brisbane Film Festival’s ambitions to be provocative, comprehensive and relevant, under its new director Richard Moore and its new spring date of November (4th- 14th). Andrew L. Urban reports.
BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL, 2001 WRAPS BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL, 2001 WRAPS
Ten years after its first edition, the Brisbane International Film Festival wrapped its latest incarnation at the weekend to widespread acclaim, reports David Edwards. Critics and the film going public have all applauded the festival as the best ever. While such Samaranch-like statements are often bandied about after events like this, at least in this instance there was substance to the praise.
BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL, 2002 - A PREVIEW BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL, 2002 – A PREVIEW
East, this year’s Brisbane film festival is offering a collection of features and documentaries from the region, in a move that highlights the nexus between cinema and real life, reports Andrew L. Urban. It started in a taxi . . .  (Pic, Delbaran)
BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL: A PROGRAMME OVERVIEW BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL: A PROGRAMME OVERVIEW
David Edwards does alphabet soup on the 7th Brisbane International Film Festival programme – and hopes it will get double A.(Dance Me To My Song, pic)
  BRITISH INDEPENT FILM AWARDS 2007 - WINNERS
Two new British films dealing with the lives of rock musicians – the drama Control and the documentary The Future is Unwritten – have been recognised at this year’s British Independent Film Awards, the BIFAs, whose focus is not as ‘film establishment’ as the BAFTAs.
  BUCKET LIST, THE - A ONE TIME ONLY
Jack Nicholson knows how to make phrases more interesting, colourful and just curvier, says director Rob Reiner, talking about their collaboration on The Bucket List – a film both men agreed they’d only have a chance to make the once.
  BUDGET 2007 – NEW WAYS TO HELP FILM ... BUT
The new forms of Government assistance to film & TV production outlined in this multi billion dollar budget are (largely) welcome, say producers, as Andrew L. Urban reports, but is Australia really serious about film & TV production when the annual allocation across the FFC and the AFC for production is still somewhere in the region of a paltry $70 million.
  BURSTALL, TIM - Obituary
A celebration of filmmaker Tim Burstall's life and work held on the April 30, 2004 at Melbourne’s Australian Centre for the Moving Image attracted a large crowd of film industry personalities including Alan Finney, David Williamson, Jack Thompson, Jacki Weaver, Ross Dimsey, Bruce Spence, Rob Copping, Dave Bilcock, John Waters and many more. Many, including Hugh Jackman and Sam Neill, also sent messages, some of which we publish here. He died on April 19, a day before his 77th birthday.
  BURTON, TIM – EXHIBIT A, ACMI
The first and most significant retrospective of filmmaker and artist Tim Burton will be presented at ACMI in a brand new exhibition as part of Melbourne Winter Masterpieces 2010, and will explore the full scale of Burton’s career, as director, concept artist illustrator and photographer, through hundreds of artworks that spectacularly illuminate the creative vision behind Beetlejuice, Batman, Edward Scissorhands, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, and Sweeney Todd.
  BUS 174 – THE BUS THAT CHANGED MINDS
Filmmaker Jose Padilha reveals the process of making a film that changed his whole country’s perception about a lonely, drugged young street kid who hijacked a bus in the middle of Rio de Janeiro. And why it will change your mind, too.





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