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 The World of Film in Australia - on the Internet Updated Friday December 13, 2019 

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OSCAR AND LUCINDA: SOUNDTRACK

CD Soundtrack Review
By Lynden Barber

While Gillian Armstrong's film of Oscar and Lucinda is somewhat tedious (partly due to the script and partly to Ralph Fiennes's mannered performance), blame certainly can't be shared by her technical and musical collaborators: the production and costume design is splendid as is Thomas Newman's score, which uses full orchestral resources as well as a choir and relatively uncommon instruments such as glockenspiel, didgeridoo and chimes to create a shimmeringly magical atmosphere. The main theme is warm, simple and instantly memorable, and while there's a strain of romanticism running through the score, it is never overdone. Richly developed, this could never be described as a hurriedly dashed off score: the music is varied, often entrancing, sometimes stirring, generally subtle, always engaging the interest. There's also traces of Irish folk music, yet minus the ladled-on gratuitousness that spoils James Horner's explorations of the area in his score for Titanic. Newman's score is always worth hearing, though the best track is Os Justi, written by Bruckner, a sublime piece of choral music. The CD also includes a five minute extract from the Audiobook of Peter Carey's source novel read by Fiennes - sensibly placed at the end, so it's easy to skip. Recommended, even if you don't like the film.

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OSCAR AND LUCINDA ORIGINAL MOTION PICTURE SOUNDTRACK

Catalogue number SK 60088

Label: Sony Classical

RRP: $30.95

Available: All music outlets

Music from the Motion Picture Oscar and Lucinda features 29 tracks.
Music composed & conducted by Thomas Newman.
Album Produced by James Horner & Bill Bernstein

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CATE BLANCHETT







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